Saturday, May 18, 2013

Art of riding

For the last three days our Victoria Police Department hosted NAMOA 2013 (North America Motor Officers Association) conference. Officers honed their skills and participated in skills events. I moseyed out for a peek today at the skills competition and it was spectacular. They make technical riding look like art. The cone patterns were tight and intricate. These riders made it look easy as butter melting in a hot frying pan - slick! The motorcycles were varied; Harley, Victory, Honda, BMW, and Kawasaki. It was a wicked day of riding. I think my favourite part was the tethered pairs riding it was fierce!





















6 comments:

SonjaM said...

I wish I could be as half as good as those guys.

Deb said...

Interesting!

I've always wondered why these police patrol units use such big bikes. Seems like sport bikes would fill the bill for chasing the bad guys and speeders.

Anyway, these dudes are impressive. And in the rain too!

Martha Tenney said...

Massive bikes! I admire those guys. I've seen a few mc cops around here and bicycle officers, too.

Thanks for sharing this.

Troubadour said...

I've always been in awe of these riders and only hope of ever being "that good". I can only imagine how much more difficult it is in the rain. Thanks for sharing.

Trobairitz said...

I am amazed at what they can do on those big bikes. All those cones would confuse the hell out of me and I'd ride right through them. They always seem to remember the route though.

Dar said...

You guys expressed the same things we did about them. It was amazing. What's surprising is that some of the Victoria officers are very new to motorcycling, but they get amazing training opportunities and lots of regular practice. About the cone course the one officer was telling me that there are directional arrows painted on the course so it's easier than you think direction wise, as for the manouevre the cop said to me what every motorcycle instructor sayso his/her students, he said its about 3 things 1) look where you want to go 2) friction zone 3) throttle control.